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Feeding & Swallowing Disorders in infants and children. Trouble eating can lead to health, learning, and social problems. Speech-language pathologists, or SLPs, help children with feeding and swallowing problems. If you think SLP can help, contact your doctor today about a referral, or call us at: 406-283-7280.

Feeding and Swallowing Disorders in Infants and children


Take a minute and think about how you eat. There are many steps in the process; from getting the food into your mouth, chewing, moving the food to get ready to swallow. Infants and children have to learn this process. Children will have some trouble at first. Drinks may spill from their mouths. They may push food back out or gag on new foods. This is normal and should go away. A child with a feeding disorder will keep having trouble. Some signs of eating/feeding disorders include:
• Arches her back or stiffens when feeding
• Cries or fusses when feeding
• Falls asleep when feeding
• Has problems breast feeding
• Has trouble breathing while eating and drinking
• Refuses to eat or drink
• Eats only certain textures, such as soft food or crunchy food
• Takes a long time to eat
• Has problems chewing
• Coughs or gags during meals
• Drools a lot or has liquid come out her mouth or nose
• Gets stuffy during meals
• Has a gurgly, hoarse, or breathy voice during or after meals
• Spits up or throws up a lot
• Is not gaining weight or growing

Trouble eating can lead to health, learning, and social problems. Speech-language pathologists, or SLPs, help children with feeding and swallowing problems.
Talk to your child's doctor if you think he has a feeding or swallowing problem. Your doctor can test your child for medical problems and check his growth and weight. An SLP who knows about feeding and swallowing can look at how your child eats and drinks and help develop a plan to help.

If you think an SLP can help, contact your doctor today about a referral.If you have any additional questions, please call us at 406-283-7280.

Source: American speech language and hearing association (ASHA)